Subscribe To Our Daily Enewsletter:

Huawei: Banned and Permitted In Which Countries? List and FAQ

Huawei Technologies faces various product and 5G wireless network project bans; business contract restrictions; security scrutiny; or pushback in various countries.

However, the pushback appears limited in nature — despite aggressive U.S. government efforts to direct foreign governments away from the China-based technology provider.

By the end of March 2019, Huawei had signed 40 commercial 5G contracts with carriers, shipped more than 70,000 5G base stations to markets around the world and expects to have shipped 100,000 by May 2019, Reuters reports.

Here’s an FAQ explaining the Huawei controversy, along with a list of countries, organizations and technology companies, and their current business status with the China-based technology giant.

Notes:

  • Initial Publication Date: This article was originally published February 3, 2019.
  • Ongoing Article Updates: This article was most recently updated on April 22, 2019 with new details about Huawei 5G network deployments (third paragraph from top of story).

Q: What Is Huawei Technologies’ business focus?

A: The China-based company is one one the world’s largest providers of telecommunications equipment, networking gear, smartphones and more.


Q: Why are some countries banning or reconsidering product purchases and business relationships with Huawei?

A: Numerous countries allege that the company’s products may purposely contain security holes that China’s government could use for spying purposes. Also, some countries allege that Huawei steals intellectual property from foreign technology companies.



Q: What has Huawei said about the spying allegations?

A: Ren Zhengfei, the company’s billionaire founder, broke years of public silence to dismiss U.S. accusations the telco equipment giant helps Beijing to spy on Western governments. SourceBloomberg, January 15, 2019.


Q: What allegations does Huawei face in terms of intellectual property (IP) and research and development (R&D)?

A: U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) on January 28, 2019, charged Huawei with bank fraud and stealing trade secrets. In a 13-count indictment DOJ charged Huawei, its chief financial officer, and two affiliated firms with a laundry list of crimes including conspiracy, money laundering, bank and wire fraud, flouting U.S. sanctions on Iran, and obstruction of justice.

Huawei denied the U.S. charges, saying requests to meet with the US Justice Department had been “rejected without explanation.” The company said that the trade secret theft allegations were “already the subject of a civil suit that was settled by the parties.”

Sources: National Review, January 28, 2019 and CNN Business, January 29, 2019.


Q: Why has global discussion about Huawei’s alleged business practices intensified in recent months?

A: Multiple factors have heightened the media coverage and discussion about the company. Questions about Huawei’s business practices have intensified amid the U.S.-China trade war talks. Also, numerous countries and companies worldwide are considering 5G wireless network rollouts. Plus, the U.S. DOJ case against Huawei is now public knowledge. Roll all those variables together, and countries worldwide are trying to decide if or how to permit Huawei to participate in 5G wireless network projects. Source: ChannelE2E compiled reports.



Status Updates: Huawei Product Bans, Discussions and Debates


Q: Which countries, regions, businesses and organizations are banning, debating or rethinking business engagements with Huawei?

A: The list below is fluid and sorted alphabetically. Check back regularly for more updates.


Apple: Huawei has allegedly pursued information about Apple trade secrets. The alleged evidence comes from The Information. Source: The Information, February 18, 2019.


Australia: Multiple updates…

  • The country has blocked Huawei and ZTE  from providing equipment for its 5G network, which is set to launch commercially in 2019. Source: TechCrunch, August 2018.
  • A formal WTO challenge by China to Australia’s decision banning Chinese companies from its 5G networks would force the federal government to justify its ban either on the grounds that it does not discriminate against any country or manufacturer, or that the decision was based on national security requirements. Source: The Australian Financial Review, April 15, 2019.

Bahrain: Bahrain, headquarters of the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet, plans to roll out a commercial 5G mobile network by June 2019, partly using Huawei technology despite the United States’ concerns the Chinese telecom giant’s equipment could be used for spying. Source: Reuters, March 26, 2019.


Belgium: Belgium’s center for cybersecurity has found no evidence that telecoms equipment supplied by Huawei Technology could be used for spying. Source: Reuters, April 15, 2019.


BT: The Britain telecom service provider will pull Huawei equipment out of its core 4G network by 2020 to fit its own internal policy. The move follows reports that the US is trying to persuade foreign allies’ wireless and internet providers to avoid the Chinese company’s equipment, citing cybersecurity risks. Source: CNet, December 2018.



Canada: The country as of early February 2019 was currently considering whether to ban Huawei from providing equipment for 5G cellular networks in Canada. However, at least one small Huawei 5G network rollout is under way in the country. Source: The Globe and Mail, February 1, 2019.


Cisco Systems: Cisco sued Huawei in 2003, alleging that the China-based company stole Cisco source code to build Huawei network routers. Huawei denied those claims, and Cisco ultimately dropped the suit as long as Huawei modified its product line, discontinuing some products. Source: The Verge, January 2018.


Czech Republic: Huawei threatened legal action against the Czech Republic if the country’s cybersecurity agency did not rescind a warning about the risk the company poses to the nation’s critical infrastructure. Source: The New York Times, February 8, 2019.


Denmark: Danish authorities have expelled two Huawei staff after an inspection at the company’s Copenhagen office showed they failed to comply with laws covering residence and work permits. The inspection had no relation to recent headlines around growing scrutiny over Huawei’s ties with the Chinese government and allegations that Beijing could use its technology for spying, something which the company has denied. Source: Reuters, February 4, 2019


Deutsche Telekom: Europe’s biggest telecommunications company, said that if Huawei is banned in Europe, it would delay its deployment of 5G networks by up to two years. To avoid such setbacks, Deutsche Telekom has suggested a new security certification process for mobile network equipment, which would allow telcos in Germany to continue to use products from Chinese vendors in their 5G rollout plans.  Sources: Tom’s Hardware, January 31, 2019 and TotalTele, January 31, 2019.



Europe: Multiple Updates…

  • The European Union is considering proposals that would effectively amount to a de-facto ban on Huawei equipment for next-generation mobile networks (i.e., 5G Wireless projects). Source: Reuters, January 30, 2019.
  • Huawei is ready to face any extra security measures required to remain in the race to develop next-generation 5G networks in central and eastern Europe, Andy Purdy, Chief Security Officer at Huawei Technologies USA, said. Source: Reuters, February 13, 2019.
  • The European Commission the week of March 25, 2019, will urge EU countries to share more data to tackle cybersecurity risks related to 5G networks but will ignore U.S. calls to ban Huawei Technologies, four people familiar with the matter said on March 22, 2019. Source: Reuters, March 22, 2019.
  • European countries appear to be tightening network security regulations rather than outright banning Huawei’s technology. Source: Bloomberg, April 15, 2019.

France: Multiple updates…

  • The country will not ban the company. Instead, France, which has safeguards in place for critical parts of its telecoms networks, is considering adding items to its “high-alert” list that tacitly targets Huawei. Source: The Straights Times, December 2018.
  • The French Senate rejected proposed legislation aimed at toughening checks on telecoms equipment, following a U.S. warning about Huawei. Source: Reuters, February 6, 2019.


Germany: Multiple updates…

  • The German government as of January 2019 was considering banning Huawei from providing 5G equipment in the country saying security concerns are of “high relevance.” The decision to ban Huawei 5G equipment would mark a shift from Germany, which has not been as vocal as other Western countries about security concerns. Source: CNBC, January 18, 2019.
  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Germany needs guarantees that China’s Huawei Technologies will not hand over data to the Chinese state before the telecoms equipment supplier can participate in building its 5G network. Source: Reuters, February 5, 2019.
  • The German government will consult further with telecoms operators and vendors before deciding whether to let Chinese firms such as Huawei Technologies participate in building future 5G mobile networks. Source: Reuters, February 12, 2019.
  • The Trump administration has told the German government it would limit intelligence sharing with Berlin if Huawei is allowed to build Germany’s next-generation mobile-internet infrastructure. Source: Wall Street Journal, March 11, 2019.
  • Germany will define its own security standards for a new 5G mobile network, Chancellor Angela Merkel said on March 11, after Washington said it would scale back data-sharing with Berlin if China’s Huawei was allowed to participate. Source: Reuters, March 12, 2019.
  • Germany has no plans to stop Huawei from participating in 5G networks in the country if Huawei complies with security requirements. Source: CNBC, April 15, 2019.


GSMA: Mobile communications industry body GSMA has proposed its members discuss the possibility that Chinese network vendor Huawei is excluded from key markets, amid concerns such a development could set operators back by years. Source: Reuters, February 2, 2019.


Italy: The country has denied a report it will ban Huawei and ZTE from playing a role in building its fifth-generation mobile phone network. Source: Reuters, February 7, 2019.


Japan: Japan’s government effectively banned China’s Huawei and ZTE from official contracts. Source: Japan Times, December 10, 2018.


The Netherlands: The Dutch government established a special task force to weigh potential security risks as it prepares to build a 5G telecommunications network. The announcement came after Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said his government was still exploring options for 5G and had not yet formed an opinion on the possible role of Chinese companies. A recommendation was expected by the end of May 2019. Source: Reuters, April 15, 2019.


New Zealand: The country’s top intelligence agency has banned controversial Chinese vendor Huawei from supplying equipment for the country’s first 5G mobile network in November 2018. Source: The Sydney Morning Herald, November 28. 2018.



Poland: Multiple updates…

  • The country is set to exclude Huawei from its future 5G network in favor of European players following the arrest of an employee from the Chinese telecoms company on suspicion of spying, officials and industry sources say. Source: Reuters, January 24, 2019.
  • Huawei is ready to work with the Polish government on additional steps to build trust, Andy Purdy, chief security officer at Huawei Technologies USA, said. Source: Reuters, February 13, 2019.
  • Poland is unlikely to exclude all Huawei equipment from its next generation mobile networks, a government minister told Reuters, in part to avoid increased costs for mobile operators. Source: Reuters, April 16, 2019.

Telus: The Vancouver, Canada-based telecom provider says a Huawei equipment ban could delay 5G wireless network rollouts and raise deployment costs. Source: Bloomberg, February 14, 2019.


Thailand: Thailand launched a Huawei 5G test bed on February 8, 2019, even as the United States urges its allies to bar the Chinese telecoms giant from building next-generation mobile networks. Source: Reuters, February 8, 2019.


University of Oxford: The university said in January 2018 that it would no longer accept new donations and sponsorships to fund research from Huawei. Source: CNBC, January 18, 2019.



United Kingdom: Multiple updates…

  • A $2 billion effort by Huawei to address security issues raised in a 2018 British government report will take between three and five years to produce results, according to a Huawei letter to British lawmakers. Source: Reuters, February 6, 2019.
  • British security officials do not support a full ban of Huawei from national telecoms networks despite U.S. allegations the Chinese firm and its products could be used by Beijing for spying. SourceReuters, February 17, 2019.
  • A UK government review involving a potential Huawei ban from UK networks should be completed in March 2019, although its findings may be too sensitive to publish. Source: Sky News.
  • The UK government-led board that oversees vetting of Huawei gear in Britain said continued problems with the company’s software development had brought “significantly increased risk to UK operators.” Source: Reuters, March 28, 2019.\
  • A top cyber-security official has said Huawei’s “shoddy” engineering practices mean its mobile network equipment could be banned from Westminster and other sensitive parts of the UK. Source: BBC, April 8,  2019,

United States: Multiple updates…

  • Huawei and ZTE technology will largely be banned from use by the US government and government contractors, according to the Defense Authorization Act, which President Trump signed in August 2018. Source: The Verge, August 2018.
  • President Trump is weighing an executive order that could ban Chinese telecommunications gear from U.S. networks, but the plan is facing resistance from U.S. carriers in rural areas whose networks run on Huawei equipment. Source: The Wall Street Journal, February 11, 2019.
  • Huawei is ready to face any extra security measures required to remain in the race to develop next-generation 5G networks in central and eastern Europe, Andy Purdy, Chief Security Officer at Huawei Technologies USA, said. Source: Reuters, February 13, 2019.
  • Huawei is preparing to sue the United States government for banning federal agencies from using the China-based company’s products, The New York Times reports. Source: The New York Times, March 4, 2019.


Verizon Communications: The telecom giant in early January 2018 dropped all plans to sell Huawei phones under pressure from the U.S. government, according to people familiar with the matter. The move followed AT&T’s decision in early January 2018 not to introduce the Mate 10 Pro to the U.S. market. Huawei devices still work on both companies’ networks, but direct sales would’ve allowed them to reach more consumers than they can through third parties. Source: Bloomberg, January 29, 2018.


Vodafone: Multiple updates…

  • Although it will replace Huawei from its core infrastructure, it will not replace the company’s technology in radio access networks. Source: Tom’s Hardware, January 31, 2019.
  • The company has “paused” deployment of Huawei equipment in its core networks until Western governments give the Chinese firm full security clearance. However, Vodafone has Huawei as one of its technology partners in 5G testing in Milan. Source: Reuters, February 7, 2019.

Updates: Send updates and perspectives to ChannelE2E Content Czar Joe Panettieri (Joe@AfterNines.com).

Related Content

Return Home

10 Comments

Comments

    Sndi:

    Can anyone explain the security issues with the Huawei equipment?
    I mean the details of where the leaks and back door are present. I have work with huawri OSN (core equipement). There was nothing very suspicious about the operation.

    Joe Panettieri:

    To the best of my knowledge, there are no smoking guns against Huawei in terms of back doors for China’s government.
    -jp

    Mona L Featherston:

    Does this include all Huawei smart phones? I have a Huawei Model # H1611 that I purchased in 2017 from Wal-Mart through the Straight Talk ATT prepaid. Is it safe to use?

    Arek:

    what about Japan ?

    Joe Panettieri:

    Mona: Check in directly with your service provider for information. Our Huawei coverage above mainly involves 5G network deployments.

    Arek: You raise a great question about Japan. Sorry we didn’t have that info earlier. We’ve updated the article to include Japan’s statement about Huawei.
    -jp

    Sandip:

    I want to add something to this, the U.S.A. might be banning Huawei products as it doesn’t want to lose its privilege of becoming a leader in telecommunications.

    mae:

    Hi, i’m a student about to travel to the United States for an exchange program and my parents recently bought me a Huawei phone. Am I gonna be stopped in immigration for this?

    Alain Bastien:

    If you think and fear it might be an issue exchange it for a Motorolla or iPhone.

    I don’t really think that they don’t have features which Huawei have which is highly indispensable

    Joe Panettieri:

    Mae: You won’t have any issues bringing the device into the country.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *