Subscribe To Our Daily Enewsletter:
bell tolls

Intel Ending Some SaaS Security Services

Intel Corp. has considerable cloud data center momentum , but the company is also killing off some SaaS security services — a surprise death knell that caught some channel partners off guard, ChannelE2E has learned. Now, Rivals like Sophos are preparing to help partners that are seeking alternatives.

First, the good news for Intel. The company’s data center-related sales (which often involve cloud engagements) are growing about 12 percent year over year, with quarterly revenue of about $4.1 million.

Still, Intel is pruning some of its SaaS-based security services. According to Intel notices viewed by ChannelE2E, the company plans to shut down products and services across its SaaS email protection, archiving and endpoint offerings.

Intel SaaS Security Statements

Intel confirmed the changes in an email to ChannelE2E, and the company vows that new, improved offerings are in the pipeline.

“Intel Security will be transitioning customers using these products to new, comparable solutions in the coming months,” a spokeswoman said. “These moves reflect normal business decisions to align organizational investments with a strategy that ensures long-term success in the dynamic IT security solutions market.”

In a statement apparently shared with partners and customers, Intel indicated:

Intel Security announces End of Life (EOL) for the following SaaS products:

  • SaaS Email Protection and Archiving
  • Email Archiving
  • Email Encryption
  • Email Protection & Continuity

The End of Sale date for these products is January 11, 2016. The exact End of Life date will vary depending on your support agreement.

For full details and answers to Frequently Asked Questions, see KB85897.

SaaS Endpoint

  • SaaS – Browser Protection and Content Filtering
  • SaaS – AntiVirus/Anti-Spyware Protection
  • SaaS – Firewall Protection

End of Life: January 11, 2019
End of Sale: January 11, 2016

Effective on the EOL date, Intel Security will no longer provide technical support for these products.

For full details and answers to Frequently Asked Questions, see KB85899.

The McAfee EOL product list and policy is available at: http://mcafee.com/us/support/support-eol.aspx.

Channel Partner and Rival Reaction

Two long-time security-focused MSPs say the Intel moves are surprising, and they’re awaiting more details before making any potential customer migration decisions.

“You’re reaching me just as the news is reaching me, so it’s sort of difficult to react,” said one MSP, who requested anonymity. “I have a good relationship with Intel. But I’ll base my migration decisions on what I ultimately determine to be the best option for my customers.” The MSP’s work in the security market stretches back to when McAfee was an independent company. Intel acquired McAfee in 2010.

Meanwhile, rival security software companies are preparing to open their arms to Intel partners that pursue alternative platforms. Sophos, for instance, will offer partners and customers free conversions from Intel’s end-of-life solutions to Sophos alternatives.

“I didn’t see this coming but we’re prepared because we’ve been competing with them for years on this stuff,” said Bill Lucchini, senior VP and GM of Sophos Cloud. “We just didn’t expect them to exit. It’s a shame for partners and customers — but it’s great for us. We’ll do free conversions for those who are left out in the cold by this.”

The free migrations will stretch into several areas, added Scott Barlow, VP of sales at Reflexion at Sophos. Barlow pointed to migration services involving “more sensitive items” like white lists and black lists. “That’s a key process and we’ve had expertise there for years.” Moreover, Sophos will offer free ingestion of Intel’s email archive systems into Sophos’ archiving platform.

Cloud: What Stays, What Goes?

Numerous hardware companies are carefully evaluating their cloud investments — which often need rebalancing amid shifting customer demands and intensifying competition.

HP, for instance, this week said it was killing its Helion Public Cloud — preferring instead to promote hybrid, private and managed cloud services while also working with partners like Amazon AWS and Microsoft Azure.

Return Home

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *